Song Dynasty Military Sumo – Real Chen Taijiquan Wrestling

Sumo is originally a method originating in China, and the golden age of Chinese sumo wrestling is the Song Dynasty.  Song era imperial guards are strong and disciplined soldiers, but they have to undergo a strict selection and training to become a royal sumo wrestler.  Descending to the Ming Dynasty (Chen Tai Chi synthesis), Sumo wrestling is listed as the six royalties- an important means of military combat training. “Real” Chen Tai Chi PUSH HANDS without armor, in ancient times- is medieval Chinese Sumo wrestling.  The modern “sticking and adhering/ soft” aspects of push hands sport is borrowed from feudal weapons training and philosophical integration.

Tai Chi Theoretical Training – Pushing Hands Is A Modern Sport

ACT- Push Hands Modern

According to a recent interview with Senior Beijing Wrestling and Sanda Team coaches, pushing hands is a modern sport and creation. It has minimal to do with the yin and yang theory in a historical sense.  In the late 1970s, confrontational push hand sports were developed, and by 1980s- standardized.   Pushing is the most popular technique in the modern Chen sport. Using one or both hands to push the other side out of the venue. In regards to factual Chen Taijiquan training in feudal times-  this style of push hands is a new concept.

Chen Taijiquan Lao Jia 74 Routine – The Crab Walk

Xie Xing

The “Lao Jia 74 Routine” is considered the most ancient form in the Chen Taijiquan system- revered for its empty-hand pugilism and push hands sports prowess, in modern Tai Chi culture.  Many practitioners today remain skeptical that Chen Lao Jia Yi Lu is the “Sword and Shield” tactics of Ming dynasty treatise, as Taijiquan authorities do not acknowledge this as the factual context of the now perceived unarmed formwork.  In the world of FEUDAL ACADEMIA, the fact is removed from fiction- historical accuracy and proper documentation is not a guessing game…   The Lao Jia 74 is characterized by the “Horizontal Crab Walk”, the form practice generally ebbs and flows Sideways instead of linear.  The sidestepping pattern is the foundation for armored knights in Sword and Shield melee.  Linear strikes are well protected by the opponent’s shield, neutralizing the Chen Tai Chi man’s sword thrust.  Therefore Lao Jia adapted “horizontal crab walking” with the Sword/Shield strategy, extremely crucial in the medieval era.  [Note: there is a misconception XIN JIA YI LU 83 Routine is new, and Lao Jia 74 is old.  The Chen Fake/ Zhaokui routine integrates the “unarmed boxing and spear” techniques of Ming dynasty treatise with the Lao Jia shield routine- greatly enhancing practicality for unarmed fighting and modern self-defense.]

Tai Chi Chuan History Misconceptions – Ancient Boxing Treatise

ACT- Ming TreatiseAncient Chen Taijiquan Boxing Treatise reveals that an alternate empty-hand boxing system is supplemented with the Lao Jia 74 Chen Village routine (sword and shield form). The Ming Dynasty boxing of Qi Jiguang has evolved a technique very close to that of modern Sanda- even more similar to Bajiquan.  The irony is that most of the Tai Chi masters nowadays have never heard of this boxing, and continue to teach Chen Lao Jia Yi Lu as an empty-hand system.  The historical misconceptions are considerable in modern kungfu culture.

Peking Opera Origins – Modern Chen Taijiquan Interpretation

Opera-fu

The modern interpretation of Chen Tai Chi Chuan history is rooted in the Peking Opera and folk tradition of the late Qing Dynasty-  standardized by the Chinese Government in 1928.  Tai Chi, Xingyi, and Baguazhang developed centuries apart, yet are instructed under one category labeled “Internal Martial Arts”.  Only the China government has authority to set the standards on internal/ external styles at that scale, as fighting lineages usually never agree on anything.