Song Dynasty Military Sumo – Real Chen Taijiquan Wrestling

Sumo is originally a method originating in China, and the golden age of Chinese sumo wrestling is the Song Dynasty.  Song era imperial guards are strong and disciplined soldiers, but they have to undergo a strict selection and training to become a royal sumo wrestler.  Descending to the Ming Dynasty (Chen Tai Chi synthesis), Sumo wrestling is listed as the six royalties- an important means of military combat training. “Real” Chen Tai Chi PUSH HANDS without armor, in ancient times- is medieval Chinese Sumo wrestling.  The modern “sticking and adhering/ soft” aspects of push hands sport is borrowed from feudal weapons training and philosophical integration.

Tai Chi Theoretical Training – Pushing Hands Is A Modern Sport

ACT- Push Hands Modern

According to a recent interview with Senior Beijing Wrestling and Sanda Team coaches, pushing hands is a modern sport and creation.It has minimal to do with the yin and yang theory in a historical sense.  In the late 1970s, confrontational push hand sports were developed, and by 1980s- standardized.   Pushing is the most popular technique in the modern Chen sport. Using one or both hands to push the other side out of the venue. In regards to factual Chen Taijiquan training in feudal times-  this style of push hands is a new concept.

Bajiquan Texas – Wu Family Bajiquan

ACT- Bajiquan Gongfu Jia

Wu Family Bajiquan has also become synonymous with the highest level of Bajiquan in the late Qing era and has a wide influence in the martial arts community in TIANJIN and BEIJING [the Beiyang New Army connection]-Chen Yu’s great-grandfather (Chen Yanxi) was Chen Taijiquan instructor for six years with the Beiyang Commander- Yuan Shikai. BEIJING GONGFU JIA Taijiquan and Bajiquan share the same approach from the Qing and trace back to the same Qi Jiguang manual. They both contain the “unarmed” boxing methods of Qi Jiguang treatise, instead of pure sword and shield (Lao Jia 74).